How Do You Hire for Employee Satisfaction?

Quality recruitment does not end at the new hire. Onboarding – your ability to train the employee and help them integrate with your company – plays a huge role. So does employee engagement, where new hires that feel like they are really a part of the company are more likely to put work into helping it succeed.

Employee satisfaction is another factor that plays a role in your recruitment. When you hire someone, it’s important to prioritise their satisfaction in order to improve their productivity.

But employee satisfaction is unique, in that, if you know what you are looking for, you can actually make an effort to hire employees FOR employee satisfaction – bringing those on board that are more likely to bring satisfaction into the office.

Tips for Employee Satisfaction Recruitment

If you want to hire people that are more likely to be satisfied employees, consider the following tips and strategies:

  • Know the Job – One of the first mistakes you can make when it comes to hiring for satisfaction is hiring the wrong person. If you hire someone that is simply not right for the position, you can virtually guarantee that they will be unsatisfied in the job. Try to figure out who your ideal employee is – the one that will not only do the best work, but will also genuinely want to do that work. Find that employee, and satisfaction at the job is much more of a guarantee.
  • Find Your Fit – Every company has a culture. Understanding that culture can help you figure out who to hire. If you’re a more relaxed workplace that does a lot of charity work, you’ll want to find someone that fits that role. If you’re a quiet place where people tend to keep to themselves, you may want to find someone that fits there as well.
  • Do Your Research – You always want to do whatever you can to avoid bias, and unfortunately, it is not uncommon to have biases you don’t even realise. But at the same time, the person that applied to the job likely has social media accounts, an online footprint, and more. It is in your best interests to consider looking at what you can see about the applicant and checking if you think they’ll be a good fit. Just be careful not to avoid hiring someone because of any biases.
  • The Value of Personality – Personality matters. Given two equally skilled candidates, the one that seems to have more positive, happy qualities is probably the one that is going to feel better working at your company (assuming your culture supports these qualities). At a minimum, try to ask some personality/character questions at the job interview to learn more about their mindset, and don’t be afraid to contact references, people that know the candidate, etc.
  • Write a Description That Speaks to Them – Similar to knowing the job is writing the description. Speak to the type of workplace you are. Be descriptive about what makes unique and interesting, and try to be honest about your best strengths. If you speak to the right people, you’ll attract the right people.

Employee satisfaction is generally something that takes place in the workplace. But with the right recruitment process, you can find someone that is more likely to be someone that scores high in employee satisfaction once hired. Since that same satisfaction plays a strong role in productivity and retention, it is in your best interests to look at your current recruitment process, and see if there are ways to identify the candidates that are the most likely to be satisfied.

3 Reasons Employee Satisfaction IS Customer Satisfaction

For jobs that come face to face with a consumer, it’s not uncommon to try to focus your hiring efforts on those that seem like they offer the best customer service. Certainly, that is important, as customer service is a skill that not everybody has.

But you may also want to take a look at the candidates who are likely to enjoy working for you – those that are more likely to have greater levels of employee satisfaction.

How Employee and Customer Satisfaction Are Linked

Employee satisfaction is a distinct measurement, and it is often related to how you’ve developed your company culture, your pay, your services, the work itself, the people you’ve hired, and more. The customers play a role (especially if they have frequent contact with the employee), but most of employee satisfaction is dependent on you as a company.

Customer satisfaction, however, is dependent on essentially two things: the quality of your products/service, and the employees that handle their needs. There may be other, minor factors that play a role, but the primary drivers are your products/services, and your employees.

Now, hiring for skilled customer service staff members is a great start. But you should also pay attention to how likely the employee is to be satisfied in your workplace. That is because satisfied employees will be:

  • Happier – Customers want to buy from happier people. Employees that are satisfied with their job are more likely to be able to feel happy at work, and in turn, pass that happiness onto the customer in ways that improve their experience.
  • Harder Working – What many businesses forget is that, while customer service matters, so too does skill and talent. An employee with only moderate customer service skills that excels at getting their job done (for example, a cashier that is bad at small talk but gets people through the line quickly) is going to make for happier customers, who will find that they are better able to get what they need.
  • Stronger Relationships – Regular customers create relationships with staff members. They recognise them. In many ways, it is a part of branding. A satisfied employee is less likely to leave, which in turn means that they are able to create relationships with your customers that helps attract them back to your store.

These are just some of the many different direct and indirect ways that employee satisfaction is directly related to the satisfaction of your customers.

Hiring for Employee Satisfaction

You should already try to hire for customer service talents. But pay attention to who you think will be more satisfied in the workplace. A large component of customer service is employee satisfaction, so hiring someone that is more likely to love their job can help make up for some small deficiencies in customer service.

How Many Interviews are Too Many?

More and more companies are changing the process they use to identify who they want to hire out of the pool of applicants. Some have added questionnaires, which they use to pre-screen applicants before determining who to call. Others add IQ tests. Some have:

  • Phone interviews
  • Skype Interviews
  • Panel interviews
  • First Interviews
  • Second Interviews
  • Third interviews

In between, they may ask for samples of work completed, have follow up phone calls, and more…

At some point, it’s too much.

The Upper Limit of Interviews and Candidate Vetting

There are some companies that do not do enough. They have maybe one interview and if they like the person they hire them. That’s not the best way to find new hires because there are simply too many variables that go into determining who is the right fit for your company.

But some businesses go too far with the opposite approach. They make the applicant go through an almost unreasonable amount of work for a job they still may not get. They have interview after interview. Extra interviews because someone was sick. Phone screenings. Asking for the creation of samples. Personality tests – on and on and on.

Businesses need to respect their candidates’ time, even while balancing the need for proper vetting. Often candidates need to take sick days just to get to an interview, or are putting in hours upon hours of work and time only to find they did not get the job. This process is gruelling and, in many cases, does more to hurt your ability to find great talent than it does help your cause:

  • Great Talent May Not Have Time – Those that are working may eventually not be able to continue to attend the interviews, or may decide it is no longer worth their time to do so. The more extensive the process, the more you may force out some potential contributors.
  • Interest Can Fade Quickly – Those that genuinely want to work for an employer but do not get one job may still apply for another in the future. That’s something that you want as a company: people that are interested in you. But if your process to hire is too extensive, applicants may want to avoid being forced to go through that process, take time off work, etc., only to not get the job again.
  • Too Much Information – Scientists often talk about what happens if you have too much data. At some point, if you look at data from a wide variety of sources, you may eventually find correlations and relationships where none exist. Think of it this way – if you have an IQ test, sample work, reference checks, and 5 interviews, at some point the applicant may mess up. But if they passed 95% of the process, at what point does that 5% no longer matter?
  • Process Leaks – There is a word of mouth component of applying for jobs. If someone has a bad experience with your company, they are going to tell their friends, and their friends are less likely to be willing to apply for jobs at your company in the future. Your process should make sense to anyone that applies. Truly amazing career opportunities, like those that pay well for notoriously great companies, can get away with a bit more because people will always want to work there. But other companies are not so lucky.
  • Turning You Down – Even if you choose to hire them, the more extensive the interview process the less likely they will be to accept the job or be excited that they work there. This is especially true for jobs that do not offer competitive pay or benefits. There are countless examples of companies that put applicants through hours upon hours of vetting, only for the applicant to turn down the job once offered because of their frustration.

So there is no specific number of interviews that is too many. There is also no rule about what you can make the person do. It is helpful to have a thorough process in place to make sure that you’re hiring the right people.

Just remember to be respectful of their time. The more you decide to put them through to get the job, the more the job will need to be worth it for the applicant, and justifiable for getting the position.

Tips to Improve Candidate Engagement

Candidate engagement is becoming the newest trend in improving the recruitment talent pool. Companies that use candidate engagement strategies are more likely to attract great talent, more likely to keep them interested, more likely to recommend you to others, and much more.

Even without realising it, many companies have strategies in place to create more engagement. For example, if you have testimonials from your employees on your website, that’s a form of engagement. If you have a recruiter connect with candidates on LinkedIn after they apply, you are engaging.

But there are many different ways to engage, and many different ways to improve how you engage.

Consider the following candidate engagement improvement strategies:

  • Treat Every Applicant Like You Want Them On Board – Every single person that applies or shows interest to your company should be treated like they will be an employee someday, even if they are nowhere near being an employee yet. Keep in touch with them, add them to some type of newsletter, let them know about open jobs – maybe even tell them some things they can do to improve their candidacy to you in the future. The more each candidate feels like you want them someday, even if it’s not yet the right time, the more engaged they will be.
  • Create a Broad Recruitment Channel – Run and operate multiple social media channels, have an active role in industry forums, show up at industry events. Do what you can to give exposure to your brand, your recruiters, and more. Create as many avenues as possible for people to get exposed to your business, and make it possible for them to contact you and engage with you from multiple places.
  • Send Them Possible Jobs – We touched on this earlier, but sending them jobs that may fit their skillset is a great way to improve engagement. It is a better strategy with larger companies that are more likely to have positions available, but sending them personalized open positions that may be relevant to their skillset is a great way to show them they matter.
  • Have A Good Recruitment Process – Your recruitment process also plays a role in engagement. Balance your need to get great information with the need to make sure that you’re doing your part to make the candidate comfortable. For example, opening your office for a late interview so that they do not have to take time off work shows them you really care about their time.
  • Give Candidates More and More Reasons – Focus on yourself as a company as well. What can you do to be more attractive as a company to potential candidates? Companies like Google and LinkedIn became famous for the things they do for their employees – free concerts, free food, unlimited days off, and more. You don’t have to become famous for yours, but you should be finding more ways to give people a reason to seek you out as an employer.

Candidate engagement isn’t easy. It takes good ideas, time, and a commitment to find ways to engage current and future applicants. But the time you spend can be a great tool for finding better talent, and getting more people interested in your company.

What is Candidate Engagement?

Recruitment is about finding and hiring the best possible candidates to fill open positions at your company. Every step you take – from the creation of the job advertisement to reviewing candidates to calling and interviewing those that stand out from the rest – is geared towards getting the best possible contributors into your company.But there is something that often gets lost throughout that process – the desire for candidates to want to work for

But there is something that often gets lost throughout that process – the desire for candidates to want to work for you, and to feel as though they actively want to become a part of your company.

Introduction to Candidate Engagement

The idea of engagement has been growing in popularity in businesses all over Australia, but it is often limited to employees. Employee engagement is the idea of integrating strategies that make the employee feel like they are truly a part of the company, where the company’s success is its personal success and those that work with you are family.Candidate engagement is similar.

Candidate engagement is similar. It is the strategy of trying to get candidates to feel like they want to be a part of your company, and that they are not just some random outsider that your company could do without. It’s making you seem like more than just an employer, and giving the candidate ways to interact and engage with the company beyond simply sending in an application.

Examples of Candidate Engagement

There are many different ways to engage candidates and make them feel more connected to your businesses. Some examples include:

  • Creating a marketing campaign that highlights what makes you a great place to work.
  • Engaging in recruitment and outreach on social media.
  • Have everyone in your company treat candidates like customers.

Think about what will make people interested in your business, and what will attract the interested in working for you. It’s important to come up with your own strategies for candidate engagement as well, because there are many opportunities out there, and the payoff for taking advantage of them can be pronounced.

Why is Candidate Engagement Important?

Candidate engagement has many benefits for employers:

  • It increases the frequency of applicants.
  • It increases the interest level of applicants.
  • It reduces the growing problem of candidate dropouts.
  • It helps new hires be more excited when they start work.
  • It spreads the word about your company to other potential applicants.

It can improve the quality of the talent pool, it can help provide damage control for those that aren’t taking the job, and so much more. If you haven’t yet considered candidate engagement, now may be the time to consider it. The earlier you get started, the more likely you will be able to see positive results.

Tips to Reduce Candidate Dropout

Much of hiring is focused on what you need as a company. It’s about finding the talent that matches your company culture, the production needed at the position, and more. From the interview questions to the recruitment process, the focus is mostly on what you can do to make sure you’re identifying the right talent.

But it’s important not to lose track of the candidate experience as well, and one of the major challenges that many companies are facing is candidate dropout. This is when a good candidate – possible the candidate you planned to hire – decides to withdraw their name from contention or turns down the job in some way.

The Problem of Candidate Dropout

For many companies, candidate dropout is a real problem. Indeed, candidate dropout is, itself, a warning sign that something may be wrong with your hiring process. Usually, when someone receives an interview for a job they are happy, and stay in contention until the moment they are either hired, or told that the company is going to go a different direction.

If someone is turning down interviews, or has decided they are no longer interested in the position in some way, it may mean:

  • You’re losing out on great applicants.
  • You’re doing something wrong that is affecting their interest.
  • Your company may have some type of negative PR, etc.

Perhaps the greatest issue is the first one. The most likely candidates to drop out of contention are those that feel they can get a job elsewhere, and often that implies that they know they are good candidates for other positions.

How to Reduce Candidate Dropout

Luckily, there are many different techniques, strategies, and tips that you can use to reduce candidate dropout. If dropout has become a problem in your hiring process, consider the following tips:

  • Make Yourself Available at Better Times – Not all dropout is due to something your company did or didn’t do. Sometimes it is caused by simply not being able to take time off for the interview. One strategy to consider is to make yourself available at times more convenient to the applicant, like after work. This helps ensure that you can hire those that are employed at demanding jobs.
  • Communicate With Them Often – Dropout sometimes occurs as a result of a lack of communication. Many companies spend weeks at a time failing to communicate whether or not the person got the job (or even the next interview). Frequent updates go a long way towards ensuring that the candidate retains their interest.
  • Respect Their Time – Similar to making yourself available, you should also make sure you’re respecting their time. That means trying to bunch interviews together, rather than forcing the individual to travel for 3, 4, or 5 interviews. It means knowing that they are taking time off work, and not dilly-dallying around and wasting their valuable sick days. Respect the time of each candidate you call.
  • Shorten Your Hiring Time – The longer it takes for you to make a decision, the more likely the candidate is going to move on. Try to hire quickly and efficiently to keep interest level in the position high, and reduce the risk of the applicants finding other positions they get more excited about.
  • Know What the Employee Sees About You Online – If you have negative reviews of your workplace, or any PR that may turn people off from working for you, the applicant is going to see it. Be aware of this feedback and address it in some way, because everyone that is applying for your job will do their research.
  • Give Them Reasons to Work With You – We discuss this a lot here at Recruit Shop, but as a company, it’s important to make sure you’re offering something that other companies are not offering. They should have a desire to work for you, because you represent something more than just a salary. Try integrating strategies into your business that will turn on possible talent.
  • Show Them How You Match Them – Sometimes all you need to do is make sure they recognise how well you fit their needs. Consider what you have learned about them through the interview process and show them that you’re the employer best suited both for their abilities and their personality.
  • Make the Interviews Engaging – When an interview is too rigid and formal, it can be an intimidating and discomforting experience for the applicant. Make the interviews more engaging. You can do this by having them take place at a coffee shop, telling them more about the great parts of your workplace, etc.
  • Offer Jobs Fast – If you think you may hire them, don’t waste any time letting them know. One of the greatest mistakes companies make is taking too much time. The applicant is looking for an answer, because they need to move on with their needs as well. Companies that take too long to offer the job tend to cause applicants to look for better work.

Each of these strategies has the potential to reduce candidate dropout, which should be a priority for all companies. The more likely someone is to withdraw their name, the more you’re losing out on potentially great contributors.

Benefits of Receiving a List of Candidates

Recruit Shop is a different type of recruitment company in Australia. Not only do we provide some of the most affordable and efficient recruitment services out there – we also provide you with a complete list of possible candidates, and allow you to contact and hire as many as you please.

Why a List of Candidates is Beneficial

The primary benefit of receiving a full list of applicants to hire is that you can fill as many open positions as you want, whenever you want, with the individuals on that list. Each one is a qualified candidate.

But there are additional benefits to having that list on hand, including:

  • Developing Your Database – More and more companies are starting to collect applicants in a database, and engage with those applicants whenever possible to keep their interested in the business. Candidate databases give you numbers to contact any time a position opens, and are a great way to cut recruitment time in the future.
  • Inspiring New Positions – Growing companies do not have to be limited to one open position. Indeed, if you receive a list of incredible candidates, you may quickly find that there are others you want to bring on board simply because they have a lot to offer.
  • Knowing Who Wants You – There is benefit to keeping track of the people that are most interested in working for your company. These candidate lists allow you to see who has been interested in the past, so you know who to contact first in the future.

With affordable costs, friendly expert service, and commitment to your hires, Recruit Shop is the number one choice for companies looking to improve their talent pool. For more information about any of our services, contact Recruit Shop today.

If you have multiple positions open in your company, you can take advantage of our discounts for multiple strategies – 10% off for 2-4 services, 20% for 5-9 services and 30% for 10 or more services. Should you want to make an additional hire on any of these services, pay just $995 +GST!

What Are The Alternatives to Job Boards and Accepting Resumes?

Many small businesses collect applications the traditional way. They post jobs on their website or a job board, collect resumes, look at them for a few seconds, and figure out who to call. It’s a process that has helped millions of employers find staff throughout Australia.

But it’s also not perfect. First, it’s impersonal. You don’t get to know the applicants, and the applicants to not get to know you. Second, it is inefficient. You spend maybe a few seconds on each resume and receive hundreds of unqualified applicants in order to find a few that are qualified. Third, most small businesses do not employ experts in hiring. Unless you have years of experience, you may find you’re prone to hiring mistakes.

So with that in mind, you may want to consider alternatives to simply collecting resumes. There are many other strategies you can try that do not require resumes at all. These include:

  • Networking – Networking is one of the strongest tools at your disposal. Meeting people in person eliminates that “otherness” and lets you already know if they’re someone that seems like a good personal fit for your organisation. At some point, you may still need a resume or some information on them of some form but some companies just go straight to an interview process.
  • Recruitment – Let’s not forget using recruitment companies like Recruit Shop here in Australia. Our role is to send you a list of highly qualified candidates, each one with the potential to perform at your business. Once we hand you the list, you are able to call and interview any and all candidates that you want, and trust that they are possible contributors. Recruitment companies like Recruit Shop do this for a living, which means we know who and what to look for to best fit your company.
  • LinkedIn – You don’t need to wait to receive resumes, or even wait for applicants at all. With LinkedIn, you can go out and find potential contributors all on your own. LinkedIn profiles act a lot like resumes already, and requesting a CV is unlikely to provide any additional information. Instead, you can simply find the people you like and invite them to interview.
  • Q/A Based Applications – Let’s say that you want to use a job board but you don’t want to collect any resumes. What can you do? You can create something like a QA application – an application that allows you to ask questions directly to the candidate. With a QA application, it is as though you are starting the interview early by finding out the information you want to know directly – rather than having to search for it in a sea of resumes.

These are only a few of the alternatives to the traditional job board/resume hiring process. As always, don’t think of recruitment as a specific approach. Think of recruitment as your way of trying to find the best possible person for the job, no matter what it takes and what strategy you want to use. If you go into recruitment with that mindset, you may find that there are other alternatives to resumes that you want to try instead.

The Difference Between A Human Resource Manager and a Hiring Manager

Here at the Recruit Shop Blog, we sometimes throw terms around without necessarily defining them for the broader audience. Since many of our clients are entrepreneurs, franchisees, and startups, it’s common to go into recruitment not always fully understanding the terminology.

One common area of confusion is the difference between a “human resource manager” and a “hiring manager.” Although the two terms can sometimes be used interchangeably in some companies, they can have very different meanings in others.

What is a Human Resource Manager?

Human resources is the department that handles all tasks as they relate to those that either currently work for your company, or may work for your company in the future. Just like an office supply manager would be in charge of office supplies, so too is a human resource manager in charge of humans as resources.
Their job encompasses a wide range of goals, and yes, hiring is often one of those goals:
• They recruit and hire staff for open positions
• They make sure that new employees have what they need.
• They make sure that existing employees have what they need.
• They make sure that each part of the company has the resource (person) they need.
• They make sure that employees are satisfied, handle employee complaints, and more.
Human resource managers are, as the name implies, the people in charge of the human resource department. Although they have many other roles, they do generally handle many hiring tasks, but they are not necessarily hiring managers.

What is a Hiring Manager?

Human resource managers have a specific title within the organisation. Hiring managers, on the other hand, can be anyone in the company at any time.

The hiring manager is the person at the workplace, generally a supervisor of some kind (although not necessarily), that is in charge of making the final decision on who to hire to replace ONE position. For example, if the IT department is looking for a new coder, then the head of IT may be the hiring manager for that job, as they are the final decision on who they want to add to their department.

The manager of the sales department may be the hiring manager for the new Sales Lead hire. The manager of marketing may be the hiring manager for the Social Media Specialist position. In theory, the hiring manager may not be a manager at all. Any employee within an organisation may considered the hiring manager if they are tasked with finding someone for an open position.

Hiring Managers and Human Resources

Human Resource managers may also be hiring managers, especially with large companies that depend almost exclusively on their HR departments. But since most applicant approval is left to someone in the department they will eventually work, that is often not the case.

Finally, the person in charge of finding and interviewing candidates may be called the hiring manager even if they are not the manager that makes the final decision. For example, if you are a department manager that has someone on your staff advertise the job, review resumes, interview, and then you are simply there for one final interview and approval, the person that did all the work was “managing the hiring” so they may be referred to as either “hiring manager” or “hiring staff” and the term is often interchangeable.

Hopefully, this clears up a bit of confusion between the terms. When we talk about recruitment, frequently we talk about the word “hiring manager” as a catch all for anyone on staff that is involved, because the tips and strategies are the same regardless of their actual title.

The Newest Business Trend – Investing in People

There is a new trend in business, and every company small or large should pay attention. For years, businesses had a “customer first” strategy. The customer is ALWAYS right. Every employee had that idea drilled into their minds from the moment they first started working, and nearly every company in Australia prioritised customer satisfaction above all else.

But times are changing. The customer is still highly valued. But more and more businesses are realising that investing in PEOPLE is getting them better results than investing in CUSTOMERS ever did, and if you’re a business looking to be competitive in today’s market, you should be following this trend too.

The Importance of Employee Satisfaction

It is no longer an industry secret. Companies that value their employees are more likely to have satisfied customers and get the best return on that investment. This has now been proven time and time again. Consider the following:

  • One employee affects thousands of customers. One customer affects one customer.
  • Productivity is directly related to employee satisfaction and engagement. Happier employees get more work done.
  • Employee engagement is directly related to employee longevity. Happy employees stay longer, thus reducing turnover and preventing subsequent loss.
  • One upset customer affects at most one or two employees. One upset employee can create a toxic culture that affects all other employees within the company.
  • Employees that are engaged and satisfied are frequently willing to do more. Customers that are engaged and satisfied are not as likely to purchase more.

These are only a few of the many reasons that investing in employees and taking an “employee first” approach makes so much sense. Although you should never ignore your customers and their needs, happy, energised, engaged, and skilled employees are going to be far more important for your business than any one customer will be.

How to Invest More Into Your Employees

This trend of valuing employees starts with recruitment. Replacement employees do not grow on trees, nor should any employee be hired simply to fill the position. At Recruit Shop, we – and by extension, your company – look to hire not only the most talented, but also those that have the most potential, and it’s critical that your company also looks for employees that they are going to truly value in order to make sure they’re getting the right people for their business.

But there is much more to this as well. Your company should continue to look for ways to maximise employee engagement and find ideas that help you seem like a better more desirable employer than other companies offer. Every company should have genuine reasons for an employee to choose you, with fun, interesting, and valuable programs, including ideas like:

  • Unlimited Vacations
  • Work from Home Options
  • Gyms and Game Rooms
  • Flexible Scheduling
  • Training and Educational Opportunities
  • Fun Workplace Competitions
  • Paid Activities
  • Better Performance Measurement
  • Easy Lateral Movement
  • Company Volunteering or Charity Days

Companies have started to become even more inventive, with craft beer Fridays, paintball competitions, paid wellness rewards, and so much more. Many of these ideas can also be free, such as allowing employees to choose a mascot for the business, or having them name the break room.

It’s not important what strategies you choose. But it is important that this is a genuine priority to you and make it a significant part of your company culture.

Happy, Better Employees

Investing more into employee satisfaction is the newest trend in business, and it’s become one of the most effective at improving your revenue and making your company successful. Take the time to value each and every employee, and you’ll not only see happier workers – you’ll see happier customers as well.