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5 Great Websites for Determining Average Salary for the Job/Industry

Part of the salary negotiation process involves arming yourself with knowledge. You, as the employer, want to make an offer that is fair to the skill level of the employee, but you also want to make sure that you’re spending as little as possible.

If you give a number, and the applicant comes back with another number, you need to know how fair that second number is before you counter, because if this is the employee you want, then you want to make sure you offer them a number that won’t cause them to walk away (now or in the future), but also isn’t more than you should be paying for someone of their calibre.

Learn the Salary Sweet Spot

Great applicants arm themselves with knowledge to address the salary negotiation process. They are going to do their research before they talk to you about salary. You should too because you need to know if you’re going to be able to offer them the right amount, when you may need to sell them on your other perks/benefits, and when you should walk away.

For that, you’ll want to look at salary websites – websites that give average salaries for the industry. While these should not be seen as gospel, and may not take into account all of the other reasons to work for your company or other factors that go into salary, they do provide you with a great starting point for your negotiations:

You may also want to do searches that are specifically related to competitors. Find out what your competitors are paying, so that you know how much you need to offer to keep this employee in your company, rather than lose them to the other.

Salary Isn’t Everything

Salary is only one part of negotiation. You can also negotiate vacation days, sick days, family care. You can also use your perks and benefits as a way to offset any salary issues. The websites above are also only estimates. You’ll still want to value the employee yourself by gauging how much they bring in and determining how much you can pay to get a strong ROI.

But arming yourself with knowledge before you negotiate is important, and the above websites will give you some assistance in the negotiation process.

Sample Email for Applicant Follow Up

As part of your recruitment process, you will want to consider following up with everyone that applies to your organisation. You never know who may be your next great contributor, or who may know someone that will be. It’s important to make sure that you follow up with each person that applied quickly, even if it’s simply a kind rejection letter.

Below, you’ll find an example of the type of email that you can write to follow up with a candidate when they are no longer in the running for the position:

Dear {{Name}},

Thank you again for sending in your application for the {{Job}} with {{Company}}. We know you have a choice in employers, and we’re so thankful that you were willing to take the time to {send in your application/attend the interview].

One of the challenges we have as employers is that we can only hire one person, even when we receive hundreds of great applicants. At this time, we have decided to move forward with other candidates. But we don’t want you to feel as though doing so reflects in any way on you or your abilities.

We encourage you to keep an eye out on our website for other positions that may meet your needs. We’ve also added you to our database, and will give you a call if we feel a job has opened that matches your abilities. If you would like to send an updated resume in the future, please feel free and email us back at any time at this email address and we’ll update it in our database.

We really do appreciate your interest, and we hope that a match opens up in the future.

Thank you again,

{{Name of HR Staff}}

There are also many ways to edit this type of email to support your recruitment process. For example, if you currently have a job newsletter that you’d like them to sign up for, you can link to it in the email. If you are planning to offer feedback to anyone that asks for it, you can mention that as well. If you have other jobs you think they’d already be a good fit for, you can mention them in the email.

No matter what type of follow up you decide to have, it’s important to consider following up with everyone that applies in some way, and to do so quick enough that they are not waiting for weeks without hearing back. This small amount of extra effort can help to take your recruitment to the next level.

Benefits and Weaknesses of Providing Applicant Feedback

You can only hire one person. You go through the recruitment process attracting hundreds of possible applicants. You call 50 or so for a phone interview. You call back anywhere from 2 to 10 for the job interview. You call a few more for the second interview, and then select 1 from the remaining talent pool.

In the end, hundreds of people end up getting rejected. Yet each and every one of those people could potentially be a contributor in the future for a different role (or at least may know someone that is). You don’t want those people to feel upset or disappointed that they didn’t get the job offer, nor do you want them telling others that you mistreated them in some way.

Applicant Follow Up

Companies hoping for positive employer branding should consider following up with at least every applicant that was interviewed, if not every person that applied. It shows each person that they matter, and it prevents them from waiting around for you to make a decision and possibly feeling discouraged in the process.

If you’re not already following up with your applicants, you could be creating some negativity about you as an employer, in a way that could affect your hiring in the future.

Following up is important. But how you follow up can vary. Some companies choose to provide each applicant with feedback about why they didn’t get the job. This strategy can have some advantages. But it also may have disadvantages. In the end, you’ll need to consider both the benefits and the risks before you decide whether giving feedback is right for you.

Benefits of Applicant Feedback

  • Giving Closure – One of the greatest benefits of this type of feedback is that it provides the individual with closure that many applicants crave. This is especially true of those that have gone through the interview process. Not getting the job, but not knowing why, can make it difficult to move on and feel comfortable about what happened. Feedback gives them information that makes it easy to understand.
  • Opens the Door for the Future – Once someone has received feedback, they can then take that information and decide what to do with it in the future. Some will move on to other jobs. But others, especially those that really want to work for your company, will take the feedback to heart and use it to get into your company in the future.
  • Shows Personalisation – Most forms of follow up are deeply impersonal. The willingness and ability to give the applicants useful feedback can be seen as you caring about their satisfaction, and showing them that they really were in consideration.

Weaknesses of Applicant Feedback

  • Unsolicited Could Be Offensive – The greatest risk to providing feedback is accidentally offending someone that did not want it. Providing appropriate feedback can be tricky, and it would be problematic if you accidentally offended someone that would have been happier simply not getting the job.
  • May Not Be Realistically Actionable – When you give someone feedback, you’re telling them what they need to improve. But the things they may need to improve either may not be possible, or may still not be enough to get them the job in the future. It is also problematic if you tell them what to change, and then after they change it you still do not want to hire them.
  • Could Be Received Multiple Times – Feedback is likely welcomed when the person has only applied once. But if they apply to work at your company more than once, then suddenly that feedback can be seen as multiple rejections. It can be disheartening for applicants to receive multiple reasons why they have been turned down for the job over and over again.
  • It’s Time Consuming – Giving real feedback can take time, especially if you have to edit the feedback and review it to ensure that it won’t hurt or offend the person receiving it. Not every company has that amount of time available to give each person detailed feedback.

How to Provide Feedback

Given these benefits and weaknesses, it’s difficult to know whether providing feedback is the best option. You may want to consider letting them know you’re willing to provide feedback without supplying it unsolicited, or you may want to limit the feedback to those that you may want at your company in the future.

Whatever you decide, it’s clear that giving applicants feedback can be beneficial. But you simply need to take the risks into consideration in the process.