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Apps That Help You Recruit

Technology has been changing recruitment. Now, more and more companies are utilising a variety of different tools – from applicant tracking systems to social media – to help find better candidates, manage those candidates, advertise jobs, and so much more.

Over the past few years, several companies have also taken a stab at creating smartphone apps specifically designed to help companies recruiters and HR staff manage various parts of the recruitment process.

Right now, there are not a lot of great tools out there to help recruiters. But things are changing quickly, as more and more developers seek out possible apps and programs to make recruitment more efficient and effective.

Recruitment Apps to Try

If you’re interested in trying out some recruitment apps to help improve your hiring process, consider looking into the following:

  • Instajob – InstaJob is designed to turn pictures that you take with your smartphones into jobs that you can easily share across your social media platforms.
  • Talent Xray – Talent Xray is a quick sourcing tool that recruiters can use to search through large job websites, like LinkedIn.
  • LinkedIn – LinkedIn has several different mobile apps that can help in your recruitment, including an app specifically titled “LinkedIn Recruiter” (although that app has not been as well received).
  • BullHorn – Bullhorn is a CRM and Applicant Tracking System (ATS) tool, and the Bullhorn app is a recruitment tool that fits in with those different software options.
  • Rocket Recruiting – Designed for MLM Prospecting, Rocket Recruiting is an app that gets prospects interest in you, not vice versa.
  • Hirevue – Hivevue is a tool used for video job interviews. It also has tools that help with screening, evaluation, and more.

Finding the Apps that Get You The Best Talent

There are many apps out there for recruitment. These are some of the most popular, but what matters more is what you think you can add to your business. Think about your current processes, and look into what you type of tools may integrate with those processes in a way that improves efficiency, reduces costs, and more.  Those are the tools that are going to provide you with the best value and help you see real progress in your recruitment.

Benefits of Focusing on Recruitment Branding

Why should someone want to work for you?

That’s a question that every business needs to be able to answer. If you think about the biggest brands in the world – Google, LinkedIn, KPMG – these companies and more are considered some of the best employers in the entire world, attracting some of the greatest talent.

And it’s not just because they make billions of dollars.

Why These Businesses Can Hire The Best People

The reason these businesses find the best talent – and, in all likelihood, the reason they are so successful – is because many of them have gone out of their way to brand themselves as a great employer. LinkedIn has a free cafeteria with paid chefs. Google offers “sleep pods” to help get employer approved power naps. KPMG sends summer gifts to each of its staff.

In addition, these jobs offer training, job growth, mentoring, and so much more.

From the creative to the financial, each of these companies (and many of the top employers in Australia) take time to find perks that attract great employees.

But it’s not just the perks. These companies also take the time to BRAND themselves as a great employer. There are many great companies out there that provide amazing perks. But not every company takes the time to make sure that:

  1. They are coming up with unique, marketable perks.
  2. They are taking the time to brand those perks to possible employees.

This is a mistake. Branding your company as a great place to work and marketing yourself for your quality as an employer has many benefits, including:

  • They Cause Talent to Seek You Out – It’s much easier to find top talent when they’re the ones coming to you. If you’ve successfully branded yourself as a great place to work, they’ll do just that: come to you to see if there any jobs open, because they want to be a part of that team.
  • They Attract Employed Passive Job Seekers – It’s not just that people will seek you out. It’s that even those that are employed, like their job, and generally aren’t looking for new work may still come to see if you have any jobs open because they know that you may still be better.
  • They Positively Brand Your Business – Companies that are branded as great places to work tend to also naturally create a positive impression in customers as well. They’re seen as a “good company,” which could help you earn more revenue.
  • They Improve Employee Loyalty – Once an employee is hired, those perks matter. They know that they decided to get a job with one of the most well regarded companies available. They’re going to be less likely to leave for a company that doesn’t have the same brand.
  • They Help With Interviews – When someone already knows why you’re a great place to work, your interviews go better as well. You have to spend less time proving that you’re a great place to work, and more time trying to figure out if they’re the right employee for you.
  • They Excite Possible Applicants – Throughout all this, it’s important to remember that your recruitment process doesn’t necessarily have to change for it to pay dividends. Job seekers that know your brand are going to be excited about the possibility of working for you, and that can help you improve who applies and who you hire.

These are only some of the many benefits of recruitment branding, and it’s something that you should strongly consider integrating into your current marketing and/or recruitment processes. The more people have heard about you being a great place to work, the more likely they are to apply to be a part of your team.

Benefits and Weaknesses of Providing Applicant Feedback

You can only hire one person. You go through the recruitment process attracting hundreds of possible applicants. You call 50 or so for a phone interview. You call back anywhere from 2 to 10 for the job interview. You call a few more for the second interview, and then select 1 from the remaining talent pool.

In the end, hundreds of people end up getting rejected. Yet each and every one of those people could potentially be a contributor in the future for a different role (or at least may know someone that is). You don’t want those people to feel upset or disappointed that they didn’t get the job offer, nor do you want them telling others that you mistreated them in some way.

Applicant Follow Up

Companies hoping for positive employer branding should consider following up with at least every applicant that was interviewed, if not every person that applied. It shows each person that they matter, and it prevents them from waiting around for you to make a decision and possibly feeling discouraged in the process.

If you’re not already following up with your applicants, you could be creating some negativity about you as an employer, in a way that could affect your hiring in the future.

Following up is important. But how you follow up can vary. Some companies choose to provide each applicant with feedback about why they didn’t get the job. This strategy can have some advantages. But it also may have disadvantages. In the end, you’ll need to consider both the benefits and the risks before you decide whether giving feedback is right for you.

Benefits of Applicant Feedback

  • Giving Closure – One of the greatest benefits of this type of feedback is that it provides the individual with closure that many applicants crave. This is especially true of those that have gone through the interview process. Not getting the job, but not knowing why, can make it difficult to move on and feel comfortable about what happened. Feedback gives them information that makes it easy to understand.
  • Opens the Door for the Future – Once someone has received feedback, they can then take that information and decide what to do with it in the future. Some will move on to other jobs. But others, especially those that really want to work for your company, will take the feedback to heart and use it to get into your company in the future.
  • Shows Personalisation – Most forms of follow up are deeply impersonal. The willingness and ability to give the applicants useful feedback can be seen as you caring about their satisfaction, and showing them that they really were in consideration.

Weaknesses of Applicant Feedback

  • Unsolicited Could Be Offensive – The greatest risk to providing feedback is accidentally offending someone that did not want it. Providing appropriate feedback can be tricky, and it would be problematic if you accidentally offended someone that would have been happier simply not getting the job.
  • May Not Be Realistically Actionable – When you give someone feedback, you’re telling them what they need to improve. But the things they may need to improve either may not be possible, or may still not be enough to get them the job in the future. It is also problematic if you tell them what to change, and then after they change it you still do not want to hire them.
  • Could Be Received Multiple Times – Feedback is likely welcomed when the person has only applied once. But if they apply to work at your company more than once, then suddenly that feedback can be seen as multiple rejections. It can be disheartening for applicants to receive multiple reasons why they have been turned down for the job over and over again.
  • It’s Time Consuming – Giving real feedback can take time, especially if you have to edit the feedback and review it to ensure that it won’t hurt or offend the person receiving it. Not every company has that amount of time available to give each person detailed feedback.

How to Provide Feedback

Given these benefits and weaknesses, it’s difficult to know whether providing feedback is the best option. You may want to consider letting them know you’re willing to provide feedback without supplying it unsolicited, or you may want to limit the feedback to those that you may want at your company in the future.

Whatever you decide, it’s clear that giving applicants feedback can be beneficial. But you simply need to take the risks into consideration in the process.