5 Great Seminars for Future Managers

It is difficult to find and hire a manager. Management itself is a tricky field, as the right manager for one location may not be the right manager for another. Often you need someone that understands management but also understands your business and the people inside of it.

That’s why the solution may not be to hire new managers. The solution may be to groom managers from within. Your next future managers may be working for you right now, learning your company and contributing to its success. When you want those management professionals to also have skill sets learned from outside sources, you may want to send them to training programs. A great place to start is leadership seminars.

Aussie Leadership Seminar and Conference Opportunities

Seminars are a good opportunity for employees to learn, and can also improve employee engagement by making them feel like you are dedicated to their career success. There are seminars both small and large all around Australia and New Zealand, so it may be worthwhile to do a search and see what is around. But for those that need a bit of help, consider the following:

  • Leadership Revolution – The Leadership Revolution Conference occurs every year in Melbourne and Sydney. The next conferences are scheduled for mid-November.
  • Women and Leadership Australia – Women and Leadership Australia has several conferences and events. Their symposium list can show you all of the 2017 events, including Melbourne, Darwin and Hobart over the next few weeks.
  • ANZAM – The Australia and New Zealand Academy of Management holds yearly conferences. The next conference is scheduled in Melbourne at RMIT University December 6th to December 8th, 2017.
  • IoD – The Institute of Directors also has several conferences throughout the year. The next one, called “Shaping the Future,” starts in May in Auckland, New Zealand.

The better your hiring strategies and the better your recruitment, the more likely your next great manager or leader is going to be someone you’ve already hired – rather than someone you go out of your way to find in the future.

That is why it makes a great deal of sense for companies to consider training their employees in-house. It improves engagement, it ensures the employee understands company culture, and it helps make everyone at your organisation a leader – even if they never end up in management.

If you need a hand with your recruitment, please contact Recruit Shop on 1300 895 987.

How to Manage Twitter Harassment Risk

Social media used to be the number one new tool that businesses could use to attract talent. Over the past 7 years, more and more businesses have started using websites like Twitter to build their brand, improve their recruitment efforts, and sell their products.

But social media is changing, and that change has perhaps become most apparent on Twitter. Now, more than ever, Twitter has become a hub for negative publicity. One wrong post or one wrong item in the news, and suddenly you are attacked by thousands of angry people across social media, with more and more people calling you out on your behaviour.

Tips to Minimise Twitter Harassment

You can’t stop all harassment on Twitter, nor can you prevent any problems from occurring. But you can make sure that you reduce your risk, and possibly have a plan in place to ensure that your brand isn’t tarnished and that you are still able to use Twitter for recruitment successfully.

  • Have a No-Personal Twitter Rule – First and foremost, avoid any accidental issues by not allowing anyone on their personal Twitter while at work.  There’s nothing worse than employees posting something accidentally on their professional Twitter thinking it is their personal Twitter. If people want to Tweet, let them do it on their phones.
  • Create an Action Plan – When something is posted on your Twitter account that causes you to get “shamed” or harassed, have a plan of action. Do you delete the Tweet? Do you issue an apology? Who reviews the error? It is best for all employees that work with your social media to know what they should do ahead of time.
  • Have Personality But Be Cautious – It’s okay to have personality on your Twitter account, but always get a second opinion on that personality. For example, a fun quip may be a joke to you, but may be misunderstood by others. For anything that isn’t 100% professional, it is a good idea to have two eyes, instead of one.
  • Be Willing to Tune Out – Sometimes harassment cannot be controlled. If you’re getting harassment you do not deserve, it may be best to avoid the instinct to respond at all. Not everyone that contacts you needs to get a response, especially if the way they are responding is hurtful or damaging.

It’s not always possible to control Twitter harassment. But it is possible to have an idea of how you can prevent it and stop it from getting out of hand. If you have social media managers in charge of your Twitter account, make sure they know exactly what they need to do so that your recruitment and your branding do not suffer.

Twitter is just one of many avenues that Recruit Shop utilises to market your opportunity. We cast the net far and wide to attract the best candidates to your role, using external and internal databases, social media platforms and a number of major job boards including Seek. If you need a hand with your recruitment, please contact Recruit Shop on 1300 895 987.

Why New Restaurants and Retail Should Take Their First Employees VERY Seriously

Every employee matters. In careers that are often considered entry level, it’s easy to feel like your hires don’t have to be the most skilled, the most experienced, or have the most potential. This is especially true when someone opens up a new retail store or restaurant.

There is a tendency among new restaurant owners to hire people last minute, and then find anyone that looks “good enough” on paper to hire. But this is a bad strategy for any business, and an especially problematic strategy for brand new restaurants, retail, and other small businesses.

How Last Minute Mediocre Hires Can Kill Your Business

Every company needs to value its employees better, as employee satisfaction and engagement have proven to be more effective at improving company revenue than focusing only on customer satisfaction. But with brand new B2C businesses, especially franchisees, restaurants, and similar small businesses, it is especially critical for reasons that include:

  • Restaurant and Store Reviews – Between websites like Yelp, Zomato, TrueLocal, and Google Reviews, any customer you have can review you at any time. If your first reviews are negative, those that were considering trying your new business will decide to try other places instead. A few bad employees can quickly mean a few negative reviews, and some businesses are never able to overcome them.
  • Time to Profit – Most businesses shut their doors within two years of opening because they simply haven’t been able to earn enough business to be in the black on their debts. That shows how crucial that early time is for getting the most on your investment. Your first employees are going to be your greatest investment, and every dollar you spent on a less than stellar employee is a dollar that may cause your company to close.
  • Limited Training Time – There is evidence that it takes an average of 6 months for even the best employees to be at peak productivity, and 1 to 2 years for those that don’t receive adequate training. If you’re starting a new business, how much time will you have to train? Finding highly skilled employees that can start strong matters.

These are issues unique to these types of small businesses. When you’re just starting a restaurant and have limited time to hire, it becomes even more likely that you hire someone that isn’t as useful a contributor.

Hire Great Staff Right Away

Hiring the right staff matters at all stages of business. The better your employees, the more successful your company will be. But it is especially important for brand new companies, specifically those that traditionally rely on entry-level employees. If you want to succeed in a difficult economy, you need to make sure that you’re hiring great staff from the beginning.

If you’re in need of new staff, why not outsource your recruitment to experts? Call Recruit Shop today on 1300 895 987 to learn more about how we can help.

Millennials in Management

For the past several years, companies were focused on how to adapt to the youngest generation’s work habits. This group, called “Millennials,” had their own unique personal quirks on the whole that were very different from past the employees of past generations. They were more tech oriented. They were more focused on freedom. They were less married to their jobs. They were showing tendencies that no other generation before them had shown, and it affected recruitment, productivity, and more.

But time has passed. Those same incoming Millennials that companies have been trying to figure out for years are now in their late 20s and early 30s. They’re already a part of the workforce, and not only that – they are now experienced enough that they are not just entering the economy, but leading it, becoming managers and supervisors for some of the most popular companies in Australia and New Zealand.

What it Means to Have Millennials in Management

The term “Millennials” doesn’t necessarily refer to a specific age range, but most people tag Millennials as those born sometime in the mid to late 1980s, all the way until the early 2000s. That means a large percentage are now old enough to take on management positions.

Just as companies needed to adapt to Millennials in the workforce, so too do they now need to recognise the differences that Millennials are about to show as managers and leaders within the company. How will their management style differ from previous generations? What does it mean for your company? How can you best recruit them? What are their strengths?

The following are some of the notes and strategies that you should pay attention to as you hire and promote Millennials to management roles in your company:

  • Many Common But Debatable Business Practices May Be Eliminated

Millennials, as a generation, are sceptical of anything that doesn’t have a clear purpose and value. There are many examples of this in business. Meetings are one example. Millennials believe that meetings only occasionally have value, and often a meeting could have simply been an email. Expect fewer meetings, at least for discussing simple tasks.

Another is performance reviews. Performance reviews, at least in their current form, are largely becoming obsolete, and Millennials are a big part of that. They are considered too subjective and do not necessarily have much effect on productivity. Expect replacements, such as verifiable performance metrics – or perhaps no performance evaluations at all.

  • Just Get the Job Done

Millennial managers are less likely to care about hours, and more likely to care about what work has been completed. This was a common trend when Millennials were younger – they would seek out positions that had a strong work/life balance. As managers, they are going to be far more likely to let someone leave early if they finished their task early, or let them run an errand during the day, or try to initiate policies that allow for a stronger home life.

But they do care about getting the job done. You can also expect Millennials to be frustrated easily with those that do not finish the projects that they were expected to do, and not very tolerant about those that do not meet deadlines – especially if they do not communicate with them first.

  • Different But Equal

Millennials are less impressed by leadership and authority. Which is why when they are actually managers, they are unlikely to treat it like a position of power. Although some fall victim to the “tell people what to do” mentality of managers (which is simply difficult to avoid regardless of generation among managers that have not yet held those positions), many others are going to treat all employees within the company as though they are equal in status, and that they – as manager – are simply expected to make the final decision.

  • Integration of New Technologies

Millennials love their tech. They are a bit more likely to be hung up on finding new tech ways of improving efficiency or productivity, in some cases to the detriment of the company but in other ways as an asset.

For example, a millennial manager may find that they want to try a program like Slack for collaborating between staff members, only to then find that they like Contriber, or eXo Platform, or Fleep, or any of the other Slack-like competitors. They may take the time to initiate it within the company, train the staff, only to switch a few weeks later.

On the one hand, adapting to new technology frequently can be time-consuming, costly, and make organisation difficult. On the other hand, they are more likely to find a new technology that does improve efficiency and helps your company thrive.

  • Almost Overwhelming Support

Within the workplace, relationships matter. You are more likely to find that a millennial manager is almost unfailingly supportive of employees and their work, giving constant praise, building relationships, and doing whatever they can to build a community within the workplace. They may be more likely to ask employees to spend extra time with them, have inside jokes, and create a more friendly environment as well.

  • Recruitment is Similar, But with Key Difference

Millennial manager recruitment is not that different from millennial recruitment for non-management roles. You still need to show that you’re a company that’s fun and interesting, and one that has a strong work/life balance. Indeed, if someone is talented enough to be a manager, you may have to offer even more – flexible vacations and scheduling, fun activities, a relaxed work environment, etc.

But there are some key differences. First, you’ll be more likely to find these candidates on websites like LinkedIn, so you’ll have to integrate that into your job advertisements. Second, you may have to overlook certain features that usually exclude candidates. For example, Millennials are a bit more likely to jump between jobs when their needs are not being met, with the average person staying at a job for only about 2 years.

You’ll need to recognise that even though they may have jumped around, they may still be someone that will make an excellent manager. Some of the indicators of a great manager that companies used to look for, most notably employee loyalty (but also the types of companies they worked for, whether they have always been employed, their experiences with a certain company type, etc.) may not be as relevant, and you’ll need to adapt for this as you consider who to hire for the position.

Adapting to Millennial Management

Just because someone is a Millennial doesn’t mean that they are necessarily going to be that different from other employees of generations past. Yes, Millennials as a whole tend to be generationally different, but every individual is still an individual, and some may find that the more they’re in the workplace, the more they adapt to how the workplace acts.

But millennial managers are coming, and that can mean some key differences in how they act and how they operate. Be prepared for what it may mean, and change your recruitment, training, and expectation accordingly.

What Is The Most Common Hiring Mistake Among Landscapers?

Landscaping is a fast paced business, and landscape recruitment is no different. Landscape business owners tend to have open positions often, and when they do they almost immediately need to fill them in order to continue moving forward with their backlog of projects.

But the general managers and owners of landscaping businesses, especially smaller ones, are also prone to hiring mistakes. Indeed, one of the main reasons that turnover in the landscaping industry is so high is because companies are simply hiring the wrong people.

Rushed and Random – Landscapers Hire Quickly and Indiscriminately

Landscaping companies have a tendency to rush their hires and make mistakes with who they bring on staff. It’s never an intentional issue, but when there is so much work to do and so little time to do it, it’s not uncommon to make errors, including:

  • Failing to account for personality, signs of employee loyalty, and other intangibles.
  • Looking for value over talent – trying to pay as little as possible, rather than find great people.
  • Advertising in only one or two places at most.
  • Reviewing the first people that apply, rather than waiting to find the best applicant.
  • Not having a plan – not necessarily knowing what to look for or what kind of person you want.

All of these mistakes can be problematic. You want talent – the best that there is. You want people that will help your business thrive and grow. Many of these mistakes make it hard to locate those people. Instead, you locate the people that apply the fastest, or look “good enough,” or cost the least, and then end up with lesser tier talent that may not stay at your organisation for long.

But these are still not the biggest or most common mistake in landscape recruitment. There is one mistake that nearly every small landscaping company makes, and if you fix that mistake you can expect your hiring rate to increase dramatically.

The Most Common Landscape Recruitment Mistake

Yet above all else, the most common hiring mistake among landscapers is allowing themselves to be in charge of hiring in the first place. Landscapers have so much to do, and recruitment is rarely something that they have scheduled time for, nor is it something they have expertise in.

Homeowners hire landscapers to make over their property because they have neither the time or experience necessary to do it themselves. Similarly, landscapers should strongly consider hiring a recruitment company to help find new staff, like Recruit Shop, that fully understands the hiring process, has the time and attention necessary to find a great new hire, and costs only $1,995 +GST (or $1,995 NZD).

If you’re interested in learning more about our service, please contact Recruit Shop on 1300 895 987.

Recruiting for a Non-For-Profit? How Much Does Recruitment Cost Your Stakeholders, Really?

Charities and non-profits are often faced with budgetary challenges. Even the most successful charity finds that they are budgeting month to month, with each dollar being earmarked for a specific purpose, and each grant being stretched to its absolute limits.

So when you need to bring someone on staff to help work for your non-profit, it likely feels as though you have to keep your recruitment in-house, and that you cannot afford to have an affordable recruitment company handle the work for you. But have you ever calculated how much you spend on recruitment?

The Hidden Costs of Recruitment

There are some costs that you’ll see right away when you try to recruit on your own. For example, even on the best non-profit job boards, you should still expect to pay $100 or so per-listing. You may also need to post on multiple job boards (many of which do not offer discounts for non-profits), and you may need to renew your listing if you are unable to find someone within the paid timeframe.

This means that you’ll be spending at minimum $100, and at maximum over $2000. That’s already a significant investment for any organisation. But what you may not realise is that there are hidden costs of recruitment as well, all of which may affect your budget:

  • Employee Cost – The person in charge of recruitment is costing your organisation for each hour they spend recruiting. Even at low salaries, recruitment can take several hours. That money is lost on the recruitment process.
  • Lost Productivity – In addition, presumably that employee had other activities they were expected to complete. This, too, is lost when the individual is being placed on tasks outside of their expected job description. Less of the work they were expected to complete is finished as a result.
  • Longer to Hire – When you do not have a dedicated recruitment manager, it can take a lot longer to find someone to hire for the job. That is also lost productivity that you were hoping to receive from the position.
  • Bad Hires – Of course, there is another risk as well – if the people in your organisation are not recruitment experts, you may find that you make the wrong choice. Non-profit organisations and charities are still expected to find the best talents they can. Hire the wrong person, and more of your limited finances may be depleted.

While it may seem more affordable to do the hiring in-house, the numbers can add up quickly. At Recruit Shop, we offer discounted non-profit recruitment services for just $1,745 +GST. That’s a $250 for any non-for-profit organisation to use our quick and effective recruitment services. Should you be unable to hire from our candidates, you will be given the choice to receive a free month of service or $1,000 back! Our service is specifically designed to help you find excellent talent, all for a cost that is often less than you end up spending on both actual and hidden recruitment costs.

Call us today on 1300 895 987 for your non-profit recruitment needs, or alternatively, fill out your details here to receive a callback.

The Struggle with Recruiting Restaurant Staff

The restaurant industry right now is booming. More and more Aussies are becoming too busy to cook, attracted to the idea of new tastes and new dining experiences, and more inclined to spend time out with friends than try to handle hosting at home.

Yet the restaurant world is struggling. It’s not the food that is the problem, nor is it the experience for consumers. The problem is in restaurant recruitment. Despite the attraction to new culinary experiences, there is a lack of interest from within the restaurant workforce – especially at lower levels.

No Attraction to an Entry Level Job

Even though there is an immense lack of talent at the top, many experts believe the problem is actually at the bottom – there are fewer people that are interested in entry-level restaurant jobs, and even fewer that are interested in committing to restaurant work in order to grow in the industry.

Last year, an article on ABC News blamed the issue on what they call “MasterChef-itis.” Their belief is that those that are entering the workforce and may consider a career in food services are unwilling to start from the bottom and work their way up to a more managerial position. Most want to start at the higher positions and be right in the heart of the decision making and cooking process – a position that usually requires years of restaurant experience first.

However, the issue may also be related to other factors of the modern workplace, including:

  • Need for Freedom – More and more young candidates are looking for careers that offer some degree of freedom, such as work-from-home potential or the ability to leave to handle any needs/appointments. That is not possible at restaurant jobs.
  • Employer Commitment – In the past, waiters and junior kitchen staff were expected to be the “slaves” of the restaurant – doing the work that the boss told them to do. But the new economy is one of equality, where young candidates are looking for jobs that treat them like valued staff members.
  • Pay/Status – Another issue may simply be related to pay and status. The more young workers are trained in technology, the more the idea of working in a low tech job that requires a lot of hard work, like a restaurant, may not have as much appeal.

Whether it’s TV, Millennial economic trends, or something else, it does appear to be a challenge to recruit restaurant staff in Australia right now. If you need help with your restaurant recruitment, contact Recruit Shop today.

How to Make An Employee Want To Work for You After the Interview

Recruiters are often tasked with two distinctly different issues. The first is being hyper-critical about who you hire. You are forced to look at each and every applicant as thoroughly as possible, vetting them for a role in your company and making sure they fit the persona and personality that you hoped you would for you. It’s a process that is actually quite powerful, as in the end you’re going to offer someone a great deal of money, and make someone else very happy.

Yet the other issue is also important. Even though the person interviewing is “lucky” to get the job from you, you are also “lucky” to have them. You want people to want to work for you. You want the best talent to believe that you’re a great place to work, to turn down any other offers they may have, and to commit to your workplace in the short and long term.

It’s that second part that is a problem for many employers, especially those that hire a lot of entry-level workers without a great deal of experience. Many companies focus so much on who not to hire that they forget that they, as the employer, are also lucky that someone talented wants to work for them as well.

Why You Should Want Applicants to Desire to Work for You

It’s important to take time during the interview to sell the applicant on the company, and make them want to work for you. The clearest reason for this is competition. Rarely does someone apply to only one job, and if they receive another offer you want them to forgo the other offer and choose your company instead.

But that is not the only reason you want to try to convince the applicant to work for you – in fact, you want to convince any and all applicants to want to work for you, even if you don’t plan to hire them. Reasons include:

  • Starting Strong – First impressions are important both in the short and long term. An employee that is genuinely excited to work for you is one that is going to come on their first day happy to be there and feeling ready to take on the work. An employee that accepted the job but is not excited to work there will notice anything your company does that makes it feel like you are a bad employer. This can start your relationship off poorly, and lead to the employee seeking other jobs.
  • Positive Referrals – Networking is incredibly important in business. Everyone you hire or interview knows other people that have talent – people you may want to employ someday. You want them to speak positively of your company to other job seekers, and you want them talking about you in a positive light to those around them.

In addition, the act of exciting each applicant to your company is one that will also teach you more about yourself. If you have not been able to come up with good reasons to convince talent to work for you, chances are it will affect you in the future.

How Do You Excite an Applicant?

There are many different ways to excite applicants and make them want to work for your company. Some of these include:

  • Be a Great Company

Sometimes you don’t need to do anything at all. You simply need to already be a company that people want to work for. If you’re a genuinely great employer, applicants will be able to tell.

If someone asks your recruiter “why should I work for you?” your company should have a great answer. If you don’t, then you need to take the time to figure out what you can implement that makes you a great employer. It’s not enough to be profitable and have a good product. Companies that value their employees and turn their company into one that is desirable will have more to share with the applicant, and thus more to attract them to work for you.

  • Have a Friendly, Well Trained, Patient Interviewer

Their first impression of your company is often the job interview. That means that your job interviewer should be well trained, sociable, and knowledgeable about how to treat each applicant with respect. Likeable interviewers that know how to conduct a fair interview and relieve pressure from the applicant are going to create fans that make people want to work for you.

Make sure the interviewer trained to promote your company, and has a plan to make sure they are speaking highly of your culture.

  • Involve the Work Family

Make sure that there is a welcoming culture on your staff for anyone that comes inside the building – applicants, new hires, etc. Teach them to say hi, and make sure they know how to be friendly and proactive. The more inviting they seem to incoming applicants, the more the company will feel like it is a great place to work.

  • Have An Interactive Component

Interviews are stressful for everyone. Some type of friendly, interactive component that relaxes the situation can go a long way towards building rapport. For example, you can take them to a coffee shop, invite them to your break room (if there is something to do, like pool or air hockey), or otherwise find a way to make the experience more like a friendship than an interview. Some recruitment experts have also said that they have had an easier time getting truthful answers when they use this strategy as well.

  • Advertise Your Strengths

You don’t have to wait until the interview either. At Recruit Shop, one of the things we promote for our clients is the idea of an exciting job description. While most people simply state the qualifications, the best job descriptions focus on all of the benefits of you as a company. They entice people to apply to the jobs, and they promote your best features in a way that will attract more applicants. First impressions don’t have to wait until the interview. Your job advertisement, your phone screens – even your website and online presence – all have the opportunity to create great first impressions.

Make the Applicant Want to Work for You

The interviews are considered a chance to get to know the applicant. But prioritise their ability to get to know you as well, and give them information and a taste of all of the great things you offer. You’ll find that your recruitment becomes easier, your employees stay longer, and you are able to get more from each employee.

Tips for Child Care Recruitment

For many, the idea of working with children is a dream. Being paid to play with children for a living means that you get excited almost every day you go to work, and while there is certainly a great deal of stress that comes from working with children every day, it is still a job that creates incredible memories and makes you feel like you’re doing important work. But companies that hire child care workers need to be incredibly selective about who they bring on staff.

They need to find employees that are:

  • Good with Kids – Everyone can like kids, but not everyone is good with kids. The ability to play with children, keep them safe, and help them learn requires a specific type of personality.
  • Staying Around – Turnover can be high in child care. Companies need those that are going to stay with each passing year.
  • Knowledgeable and Intelligent – Child care often involves quick thinking, the ability to see and spot problems, excellent focus, and more.

With all of these needs in mind, the following are several strategies that you can use to improve your recruitment process and hire better child care workers.

How to Hire for Child Care

  • Take Advantage of Self-Selection

You want people with both passion and energy. Self-selection strategies are excellent for this type of career. Self-selection is when you require extra tasks to go along with the resume/CV before it can be accepted. For example, require that applicants submit answers to 5 questions, as well as share 3 ideas for children’s games before they can apply.

Those that do not have a passion for child care, and those that are unwilling to give their work their full effort will be unwilling to do these extra requirements. Those that are willing to do the extra work are showing many positive qualities that are important in the child care workplace.

  • Prioritise Personalities

Experience in child care is excellent to have. But personalities, especially when children are at a younger age, is often as important. See who has the right attitude to work with children. Find ways to analyse candidates during their interview that teach you about their personality, and use that to determine who to hire.

  • Offer Amazing Training

For many, working with children is natural. That means that hiring may not be the main issue. Their ability to thrive depends on you. Offer in-depth training that helps them understand how to act with children, how to keep them safe, how to collaborate with other staff, and more. This training both improves the quality of your hires, and reduces turnover by making the job easier on the staff.

Contact Recruit Shop Today

If you are looking to hire child care workers in Australia, and want help finding the best possible staff members, contact Recruit Shop today – the most affordable, most effective Aussie recruitment agency.

Why Outsource Recruitment?

You run a business. That means that you are responsible for every component of your company. Not only do you direct your talent and lead the hiring decisions – you also clean the toilets, do all of your accounting, study law to handle all of your legal needs, and manage your company when you’re on vacation.

Oh wait, you don’t?

One of the first things you learn when you run a successful business is that you simply cannot do it all on your own. You can’t – and shouldn’t be – an expert on everything. There are those out there that can handle tasks for you, and the more you use their expertise, the more your company will save in the long term and the more effective your company will be.

Benefits of Outsourcing Recruitment

At Recruit Shop, we work with small and medium size companies all over Australia and New Zealand. We have been recruiting top candidates at exciting startups, small family establishments, and more, and use that experience on each of our clients. These clients choose us because they know all about the benefits of outsourcing recruitment, including:

  • Lower Cost – Yes, even though recruitment “costs money,” when you add up all of the costs of recruiting in house, you’ll find that it is much greater. From posting on job boards, money paid to your employees, and the lost productivity that they could have provided on other tasks, an affordable recruitment service like Recruit Shop ends up being a bargain by comparison.
  • Little Need for Oversight – When you outsource to Recruit Shop, we keep you posted along the way, answering any questions you may have, etc. But you are also able to trust that we have started the ball rolling, because it’s our only job. It’s all we do. With employees in house, you have to check in often, review emails, make sure that whomever is in charge of hiring is taking action, and much more. It often requires even more staff, and is very time consuming.
  • Expertise – Of course, most people are not experts at recruitment either. We have a reputation for finding excellent performers that match the culture of your business, and use that expertise with each client we work with.

While many people ask why they should use outsource their recruitment, a better question is – what is the benefit of doing recruitment in house? Often you’ll find that there is no real answer.